Fall Conference 2019

Malama Honua:

Think Globally - Act Locally



The HaSTA fall conference is an opportunity for science educators to get together, learn from each other, check out exhibits, and listen to a great keynote speaker. The conference is FREE for paid members!

Become a member HERE.

Register for the conference HERE.
 
2019 Fall Conference

When:  Saturday, NOVEMBER  2, 2019. 7:45 am - 12:45 pm

Where:

McKinley High School 1039 South King Street, Honolulu Hawaii

Presenters listed below for Sessions A and B.  Abstracts follow this list.

 

Room

Session A- Choose from 5 Presentations

 

Session B- Choose from 6 Presentations

TBD

The "electromagnetic" Force is Strong in this one!

Richard Jones

University of Hawaiʻi West Oʻahu    NSTA District XVI Director

Make-and-take (making something to take home)

 

Real World Science developed by the World War II Museum in New Orleans integrates STEM and history

Nina Fujimoto

Real World Science/Teacher at Kaimuki Middle School

Workshop Presentation (lesson modeling/engagement)

 

 

Experiencing a Phenomenal GRC Lesson

Lance Nishimura - Dreamhouse ʻEwa Beach, Math Instructional Coach

Lauren Nishimura - Dreamhouse ʻEwa Beach, Science Instructional Coach

Workshop Presentation (lesson modeling/engagement)

 

Evolution for Middle School Educators

Bertha Vazquez -Science teacher and TIES Director

Kenny Coogan - Science Teacher & Associate, The Teacher Institute for Evolutionary Science

Workshop Presentation (lesson modeling/engagement)

 

 

Open NGSS Resources for Middle School

Lori Andersen

UH Mānoa Assistant Specialist

Info Session (sharing info about an experience or program)

 

 

ʻĀina-Informatics:

 Bioethics and genetics in the science classroom

 Eric Tong, ʻIolani School, ʻĀina-Informatics Program Coordinator

Megan Kawatachi, ʻIolani School, Public-Private Initiatives Coordinator

Info Session (sharing info about an experience or program)

 

 

Place-based NGSS Curriculum Units

Lisa Marten

Healthy Climate Communities

Workshop Presentation (lesson modeling/engagement)

 

 

Reflection on my NSTA conference experience: The Power of Hands-on Learning!    Stories from the HECO Ambassador

 Eric Beydler

Recent COE UH Mānoa graduate

Info Session (sharing info about an experience or program)

 

 

Science Education at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

Mark Heckman, Britanie Iraheta

HIMB - Hawai’i Institute of Marine Biology

Workshop Presentation (lesson modeling/engagement)

 

 

Svalbard the Living Classroom: National Geographic Grosvenor Teacher

Blade Shepherd-Jones

Info Session (sharing info about an experience or program)

 

Only 5 presenters in Session A

 

Our Project In Hawaii's Intertidal (OPIHI): A Citizen science program for middle and high school teachers and students

Joanna Philippoff - University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Assistant Specialist

Cuyote Harkins -Farrington High School

Anuschka Faucci - Leeward Community College

Informational Session (sharing information about an experience or program)

 

ABSTRACTS

 

 

Room

Session A

Room

Session B

 

 

 

 

 

 

The "electromagnetic" Force is Strong in this one!

Richard Jones

University of Hawaiʻi West Oʻahu    NSTA District XVI Director

Explore the power of the force, the electromagnetic force in this hands-on/minds-on workshop exploring the relationship between magnetism and electricity. Levitate objects using the "magnetic" force, build electromagnets, measure the force of these electromagnets, build and take home a simple motor. Basic electrical circuits will also be discussed.

Aligns to Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions 3-PS2-3, 3-PS2-4, MS-PS2-3, MS-PS2-5, HS-PS2-5. Crosscutting Concepts: Developing and Using Models, Planning and Carrying Out Investigations.

 

Real World Science developed by the World War II Museum in New Orleans integrates STEM and history

Nina Fujimoto

Real World Science/Teacher at Kaimuki Middle School

Real World Science developed by the World War II Museum in New Orleans integrates STEM and history with lessons showing students how science and technology helped the United States overcome big challenges during the war. Free NGSS aligned curriculum/educational resources relate how necessity, knowledge, perseverance and skill lead to inventions, innovation, and careers in STEM, just like in World War II. The lessons are geared primarily for 5th through 8th grade but can be modified for high school. Free copies of the Teacher Handbook and Supplement will be available.

 

 

 

Experiencing a Phenomenal GRC Lesson

Lance Nishimura - Dreamhouse ʻEwa Beach, Math Instructional Coach

Lauren Nishimura - Dreamhouse ʻEwa Beach, Science Instructional Coach

Participants will engage in the GRC (Gather, Reason, and Communicate) Framework to experience how elementary students can immerse themselves in the 3 Dimensions of the NGSS. They will use the science and engineering practices to gather information, gain understanding through reasoning, and communicate arguments for why or how their evidence supports their explanation of a phenomena.

 

Evolution for Middle School Educators

Bertha Vazquez -Science teacher and TIES Director

Kenny Coogan - Science Teacher & Associate, The Teacher Institute for Evolutionary Science

The Teacher Institute for Evolutionary Science (TIES) is a network of over 60 teachers providing free workshops for middle school science teachers. We’ve presented 150 workshops in 49 states in four years. The purpose of TIES is to inform interested middle school science teachers about the most up-to-date concepts of natural selection and common ancestry for them to confidently fulfill their curriculum requirements. Our slide presentation has the web’s best evolution videos, active learning ideas, and websites embedded in the slides. It has been reviewed by many experts, including a former NSTA president and a member of the NGSS development team. TIES is about teachers helping teachers. We are our own best resources. TIES has simply compiled these free resources in one place because we, as classroom teachers ourselves, understand how busy a teacher’s day-to-day routine can become.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open NGSS Resources for Middle School

 

Lori Andersen

UH Mānoa Assistant Specialist

 

Participants will learn about new open-source science curriculum materials that were released in August 2019 for grades 6, 7, and 8. The curriculum is a free, coherent, rigorous, research-based set of instructional materials that can support all students in meeting the vision for science literacy described in A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards. In the curriculum, students experience learning by making sense of ideas from their own perspectives in iterative cycles of investigating phenomena, refining questions, improving explanations and models with new evidence, and further questioning. Available materials include teacher guides, student materials, and professional development.  The units were given the highest ratings by Achieveʻs Science Peer Review Panel. Participants will learn about unit design by exploring the sixth grade unit on thermal energy. Participants will be able to download the teacher guide and student guide.

 

ʻĀina-Informatics:

 Bioethics and genetics in the science classroom

 

 Eric Tong, ʻIolani School, ʻĀina-Informatics Program Coordinator

Megan Kawatachi, ʻIolani School, Public-Private Initiatives Coordinator

 

Bioethics in its broadest sense is the study of ethical issues relating to scientific advancements in biology & medicine. For the field of genetics and genomics, these ethical considerations often manifest at the intersection of the biomedical, ecological and social sciences, presenting unique teaching challenges for science educators. Yet, the fast-moving horizons of biotechnology have necessitated an urgent discussion on the ethics surrounding emerging technologies with the potential to permanently disrupt our relationships with one another and the natural world. And as these consequences can propagate through large segments of humanity, how we implement, regulate and continue to innovate these technologies should be guided by our collective sense of morality and justice. How can science educators locally equip our students with the necessary content literacy and empathy in order to amplify their voice within the broader global bioethics debates? How do we create a robust place-based yet globally-relevant bioethics curriculum to accompany classroom units on genetics, genomics and biotechnology? Along with presenting some new resources for student/teacher research and curriculum ideas, we hope to engage participants in a discussion exploring the ways in which we can grapple with these challenging topics from within the science classroom.

 

 

Room

Session A

Room

Session B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place-based NGSS Curriculum Units

 

Lisa Marten

Healthy Climate Communities

 

New place-based NGSS curriculum units available to all teachers. Hawai‘i DOE grade-level performance standards for NGSS met with a Hawaii focus, and direct connections to Hawai’i Math, English, Social Studies Standards and the Nā Hopena A‘o framework. Each unit covers multiple Disciplinary Core Ideas and ends with Engineering Design. Each lesson includes and essential question, a phenomenon and diverse learning activities. • Teacher guide • Student workbook • Slide shows for classroom use • Provided free online • Training available Earth Systems in my Ahupua’a 5th grade Features Hawai’i GIS maps, real data, local weather systems, native plants, and Hawai’i images and illustrations. Piloted last year, ready to use! Global Climate Change: Local Impact and Action 6th (integrated) or 8th (disciplinary) grade Features lab work, graphing with local data, evidence-based writing, and school-focused design task. Piloted last school year, ready to use! Carbon Cycle off Balance High School biology Each lesson is introduced with an experiment. The unit covers photosynthesis, the carbon cycle, ecosystem instability, and includes an engineering design task based on real local data. Ready to pilot, materials and support available. The units were written by local teachers in collaboration with Healthy Climate Communities, a local non-profit focused on education and action to fight climate change.

 

Reflection on my NSTA conference experience: The Power of Hands-on Learning!

Stories from the HECO Ambassador

 

 Eric Beydler

Recent COE UH Mānoa graduate

 

Learning by doing is a powerful and highly effective tool that can be leveraged by science teachers, assistants, museum coordinators, and more. In this workshop participants will gain insights into learning strategies and my experience from the 2019 NSTA conference in San Francisco. A key emphasis of this workshop is on the importance of hands-on science activities and the connection to local/relevant student experiences. Participants will also develop a deeper understanding of Mālama Honua and how engaging hands-on activities can be used to drive science instruction. There will be a brief slideshow presentation followed by a hands-on activity to engage participants.

 

 

 

 

Science Education at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology


Mark Heckman, Britanie Iraheta

HIMB - Hawai’i Institue of Marine Biology

 

We will investigate one of our developing lab offerings for schools, utilizing classroom drones as an example of new tools available to researchers. In addition, we will introduce the other lab modules and programs available at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology for educators. Come try your hand at lifting off a micro drone in a controlled setting.

 

Svalbard the Living Classroom:

 National Geographic Grosvenor Teacher

Blade Shepherd-Jones

The Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Grosvenor Teacher Fellows is a professional development program that is commitment to geographic education. The 2019 Fellows, a group of 45 educators from the United States and Canada, embarked on global expeditions on board several Lindblad ships to enhance their geographic knowledge with hands-on, field-based experiences that they will bring back to their pre-K–12 classrooms, communities, and professional networks.

Blade Shepherd-Jones traveled to Svalbard (Norwegian archipelago between Norway and the North Pole), where he worked with Lindblad and National Geographic naturalists to study and to document Arctic wildlife, geology, and culture.  The students will model the numerous phenomena of Arctic Svalbard via the principles of Philosophy for Children (p4c), an approach that engages in self-inquiry and dialogue.  The students will participate in lessons to compare and to contrast Hawaii to Svalbard.  

 

 

 

Our Project In Hawaii's Intertidal (OPIHI): A Citizen science program for middle and high school teachers and students

Joanna Philippoff - University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Assistant Specialist

Cuyote Harkins -Farrington High School

Anuschka Fauci - Leeward Community College

OPIHI is a citizen science program where middle and high school teachers and students engage in an authentic research project. Although Hawaii’s intertidal is a culturally and ecologically important ecosystem susceptible to climate change, it has been understudied due to seasonal wave activity and a small tidal range. However, this area is ideal for engaging emerging scientists because, although accessible, a large number of individuals are needed to monitor the environment. We will share how teachers throughout Hawai‘i have integrated OPIHI into their curriculum, the effects of OPIHI on student learning and engagement, and how scientists are using OPIHI data.

 




Hawai‘i Science Teaching Association 


Honolulu, Hawai‘i 


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